Guilherme Paulus Talks About How CVC Was Launched

Guilherme Paulus is among the most important figures when talking about the growth of the tourism industry in Brazil. Starting his career as a computer technician and an intern for IBM, Paulus became one of the most powerful businessmen in the country. He is the co-founder of CVC Brasil and GJP Hotels and Resorts.

CVC was founded in 1972, when Guilherme Paulus was 24 years old. The idea for the company came from Carlos Vicente Cerchiari, a state deputy at that time. The two met on a boat trip, when Cerchiari told him about his interest in launching a tourist agency where he lived, in Santo Andre. Because Paulus was young and did not have enough money to invest in the idea, Cerchiari proposed the arrangement where he would provide the investment in order to start the venture, and Paulus would have to provide the groundwork.

At the time, Guilherme Paulus was working for Casa Faro in Sao Paulo, but was motivated to join the project, and eventually accepted the challenge that the opportunity provided. He was acknowledged for his entrepreneur instinct when it was time to open CVC’s first location. Paulus wanted to open the agency in a place where there is constant movement, traffic, and a flow of people. They ended up establishing the company close to a movie theater, Paulus being aware that people would be passing by their stores as they would leave the movies. The partnership between Cerchiari and Paulus ended after 4 years, Paulus becoming the sole owner of CVC, which is when the expansion process took off.

Today, after more than 45 years in business, CVC is considered the largest tourism operator in Brazil and Latin America. In 2009, Paulus sold a portion of the company, but he continues to own a stake in CVC, being heavily involved in its operations. In 2005, Guilherme Paulus launched GJP Hotels and Resorts. What started as a small venture became a large hotel chain with locations across the country. As a result of his work with the company he earned the title Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017.

Shervin Pishevar warns that worst assaults by tech monopolies are often covert

Shervin Pishevar has become a fixture on the tech scene. Since founding Investment company more than a decade ago, Shervin Pishevar has worked on some of the most dynamic and disruptive companies that Silicon Valley has produced. Some of the firms that Shervin Pishevar has helped launch include such names as Airbnb, Virgin Hyperloop and Uber. As an entrepreneur on his own, Shervin Pishevar has also personally launched a number of highly successful tech ventures. These include Ionside, WebOS and Social Gaming Network.

Pishevar also manages to find the spare time to operate one of the most-followed Twitter accounts in Silicon Valley. Before his more than 100,000 followers, Pishevar often holds forth on some of the most pressing concerns of our times. Among these, one of Pishevar’s frequently visited topics is that of the pernicious effects that tech monopolies will ultimately have on the state of innovation in American and, ultimately, the viability of the U.S. economy.

Big tech monopolies pose dire threat

Shervin Pishevar doesn’t dance around the issue when he warns that tech monopolies could quite literally sink the economy. He has seen, first hand, how the moves, both overt and covert, that the tech monopolies use to continue their iron grip over their markets can utterly destroy companies unlucky enough to wander into their kill zone.

One of the ways in which these tech monopolies pursue their quarry is through such covert means as lawfare. Firms like Google understand that the average American simply isn’t going to be concerned with the arcana of an intellectual property lawsuit, for example. However, with its army of lawyers and endless cash reserves, Google can take companies that it wants eliminated through the wash, forcing them to either defend themselves to the tune of hundreds of millions in legal fees or give up, facing ruinous default judgments and cease-and-desist orders.

Pishevar says that this has actually occurred to one of his own companies, Uber, when Google targeted that firm’s self-driving car operations for elimination. Google simply didn’t want the competition. And Uber was barely able to hang on.

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